Mythical Giant's causeway in Northern Ireland

Giant's causeway



Giant's causeway is the most visited and a natural attraction from Northern Ireland. It is located at the county Antrim. This place is developed by the volcanic eruption about 50 millions year back. This area is comprises of approximately 40 thousands of basalt hexagonal columns. These hexagonal shapes were formed when the volcanic lava cooled. This kind of natural places are not unique but very rare. That's why lot of people use to travel here.


Giant's causeway



Giant's causeway is a world heritage site and most of the part is now own by the National trust. That's why one needs to pay an entree fee while visiting this rare natural phenomena. We've gone there after visiting the Portcoon Jetty which is at the opposite direction from the gate. That's why it took us a while to go there. And by that time several day trip buses were arrived with tourists. So the place was a bit of crowded. But it was another fun to see the activities of different people.


Giant's causeway



The basalt columns from the Giant's causeway are mostly hexagonal shaped. Although there are lot of other shapes as well. It was really a fun to hopping from one to another. Also sitting over there for a while and watching other people was exciting as well. At one place, it looked like that the stair like basalt columns came from the cliff and submerged in water directly. It is very hard to believe that it was naturally built.


Giant's causeway



There is a myth or legend remains about this Giant's causeway. As per the legend it is the fight between the two giants. One is from Ireland named Finn MacCool and other one is from the Scotland named Benandonner. More information about the fight can be found in Wikipedia. Although people most of the tourists do not believe about this myth. But they still try to sense the presence of the Giants around the place.


Giant's causeway



We've spent around 3 hours around the Gian't causeway. It was the low tide when we were there. Not sure how it'd look like during high tide and plenty of water splashing over the basalt columns. It was a bit of rainy for a while as well. We've done some small trekking around to explore the area. There are some red colored soil (or nearly rocks) which looks like a flame in green. Also the cliffs around are also beautiful.


Giant's causeway



How to go:

From Bushmills town you can use the bus 402 to reach at Giant's causeway. It takes round 5-10 minutes to reach there. Also, during the summer a tourist can use the steam shuttle train that runs between Bushmills and the Giant's causeway. It is a bit of costly but antique. As I was there during autumn that's why I've missed this opportunity.


Giant's causeway



Entree fee:

Yes, you have to pay for it. When you enter you don't need to pay the fare that time. Tickets are only checked when you are coming back after your visit. So if you have a plan to do a Giant's causeway coastal route trekking after entering then you might not have to pay as you'd exit through different area. Usually the ticket price is around 10 pound per person. There is a debate regarding the ticketing system. I am with the ticketing system as it helps the National trust to get few money for restoring this site along with other tourists attractions.


Giant's causeway



Where to stay:

The Causeway hotel is very near and suitable for the tourists visiting the Giant's causeway. Also there are plenty of hotels from Bushmills as well.


Booking.com



If you want to take your photo with no crowd or less crowd then you have to be patient for a while. Cause the tourists use to come and go very frequently. They do not stay there for long. This would allow you to take your desired photo. Also if you go there in early morning then there is a fair chance to beat the crowd in Giant' causeway.


Giant's causeway



Giant's causeway
This is the view when we've just entered inside the premise. The color is due to Autumn.



Giant's causeway
This road leads us to the Giant's causeway. People can use the shuttle bus if they want to skip walking. But have to pay 1 pound for each way.



Giant's causeway
We didn't explore this area much. These are basically the irregular shaped rocks formed after volcanic eruption.



Giant's causeway
But this area is less crowded as most of the tourists use to go near the causeway.



Giant's causeway
Few rocks were bigger like this one.



Giant's causeway
This is when we first started to seeing the hexagonal shapes.



Giant's causeway
These are black colored as most of the time they remain under water.



Giant's causeway
A portion of iconic Giant's causeway.



Giant's causeway
This area remains crowded almost every seconds as it is a famous photo or selfie taking spot for the tourists.



Giant's causeway
Vast Giant's causeway. It is not possible to take everything in one frame, unless someone uses a drone.



Giant's causeway
When we've reached there it was after low tide.



Giant's causeway



Giant's causeway
It is hard to believe that these columns were created naturally.



Giant's causeway
These columns look like pillar.



Giant's causeway
People could easily walk over these columns.



Giant's causeway
Some of those columns are craked and looks as if placed one over another.



Giant's causeway
Hexagonal shapes from Giant's causeway.



Giant's causeway
Hexagonal shapes from Giant's causeway.



Giant's causeway
Hexagonal shapes from Giant's causeway.



Giant's causeway
Hexagonal shapes from Giant's causeway.



Giant's causeway
Lot of visitors use to sit on a place like this and take their photo.



Giant's causeway
It was raining for a short period of time while we were there.



Giant's causeway



Giant's causeway
It looks like that the stairs came from the mountain.



Giant's causeway
And then ends at the ocean.



Giant's causeway
Snake tail of the Giant's causeway stairs.



Giant's causeway
View of the cliffs near the Causeway. We've gone there later.



Giant's causeway
Closer look towards the cliff.



Giant's causeway
Millions of basalt columns from the Giant's causeway.



Giant's causeway
Water trapped (during high tide wave) over the cup shape of hexagonal column.



Giant's causeway
These were very colorful. Probably live corals are growing over the rocks.



Giant's causeway
These are the tall columns around the causeway.



Giant's causeway



Giant's causeway
This is how nature is claiming these again by growing grass.



Giant's causeway
A solitary rock near the causeway.



Giant's causeway
We started a short hike to explore the causeway area.



Giant's causeway
There were plenty of tourists around.



Giant's causeway
After exploring this area later we've gone over the cliffs for causeway coastal trekking.



Giant's causeway
View of the tall columns from the top of the cliff.



Giant's causeway
More semi bird's eye view over the Giant's causeway.



Giant's causeway
This area was really beautiful. Specially the colorful soil amid of greens.



Giant's causeway
Few more colorful soil.



Giant's causeway
Zoomed near the color. Looks like fire.



Giant's causeway
Mini cliffs near the crystal cler water.



Giant's causeway
Closer look at the base. Looks like the lava.



Giant's causeway
Few more colorful rocks or soil.



Giant's causeway
It looks like these natural columns are holding the cliffs.



Giant's causeway
A group of solitary columns still standing firm. This is known as The Chimney Stacks.



Giant's causeway
These basalt columns are all mounted on the cliff. Appears like bended by the pressure of the cliff.



Giant's causeway



Giant's causeway



Giant's causeway



Giant's causeway



This article is the continuation after the Portcoon Jetty. We've gone for a Giant's causeway coastal walk from here.


Giant's causeway,
County Antrim,
Northern Ireland.
GPS coordinate (55°14'24.2"N, 6°30'42.2"W).
List of hotels from Bushmills



This article has written by Lonely Traveler,
for the blog http://icwow.blogspot.com/



Monday, 30 October 2017


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